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Saturday, August 15, 2009

Revit lighting technical tip

Here's a great repost about Revit lighting. Can you say LEED EQ8.1?

Great work David!

http://www.technology4design.com/?p=481
technology4design The conspiracy theorist

One such frustration is Revit lighting. Last year, it all began with the happy announcement of the inclusion of Mental Ray rendering and the ability to use manufacturer-based IES web distribution files for Revit Architecture 2009. The Revit consultants were all a little smug about the ease of achieving high-quality output that could rival our 3DS Max counterparts like Paul Grimston (although he’d never admit it) without knowing what every button does.

Anyway, I was more than happy to field a call from a Revit customer who was trying to achieve an accurate linear fluorescent uplighting effect. In the test file, instead of an even spread of light, there were hotspots everywhere.

clip_image001

As you’d imagine, it took less than 5 minutes and 400 mouse-clicks to wipe the smug ‘know-it-all’ grin off my face. This was a real problem.

My early efforts were futile. From downloading a manufacturer’s ‘strip light’ IES file to the desperate variation of random parameters within the lighting family: nothing worked.

Finally, I started to apply a more methodical approach and began to review the Type and Instance Parameters for the family.

In the Type Properties of the family, I saw the following parameters. Most were self-explanatory, but it was worth researching the Help system.

image

From the Help system, I ‘discovered’ that Emit from Light Length means the length of the line that represents the light source in a rendered image. So, this does affect the rendering and needs to be set to the length of the tube.

Light Source Symbol Size is apparently the radius of the representative symbol. According to the Help system, This parameter does not affect the light in a rendered image.

Changing these settings improved the output, but it was far from perfect.

image

Finally, I applied common sense. That elusive attribute told me that this was a linear light source and, in the absence of reflectors, there was a uniform spherical distribution around the fixture.

So I changed the Light Source Definition in the Family from Linear + Hemispherical to Linear + Spherical:

image

The result:

light test project3-7-09-1b


technology4design » Blog Archive » The conspiracy theorist: "One such frustration is Revit lighting. Last year, it all began with the happy announcement of the inclusion of Mental Ray rendering and the ability to use manufacturer-based IES web distribution files for Revit Architecture 2009. The Revit consultants were all a little smug about the ease of achieving high-quality output that could rival our 3DS Max counterparts like Paul Grimston (although he’d never admit it) without knowing what every button does.

Anyway, I was more than happy to field a call from a Revit customer who was trying to achieve an accurate linear fluorescent uplighting effect. In the test file, instead of an even spread of light, there were hotspots everywhere.

clip_image001

As you’d imagine, it took less than 5 minutes and 400 mouse-clicks to wipe the smug ‘know-it-all’ grin off my face. This was a real problem.

My early efforts were futile. From downloading a manufacturer’s ‘strip light’ IES file to the desperate variation of random parameters within the lighting family: nothing worked.

Finally, I started to apply a more methodical approach and began to review the Type and Instance Parameters for the family.

In the Type Properties of the family, I saw the following parameters. Most were self-explanatory, but it was worth researching the Help system.

image

From the Help system, I ‘discovered’ that Emit from Light Length means the length of the line that represents the light source in a rendered image. So, this does affect the rendering and needs to be set to the length of the tube.

Light Source Symbol Size is apparently the radius of the representative symbol. According to the Help system, This parameter does not affect the light in a rendered image.

Changing these settings improved the output, but it was far from perfect.

image

Finally, I applied common sense. That elusive attribute told me that this was a linear light source and, in the absence of reflectors, there was a uniform spherical distribution around the fixture.

So I changed the Light Source Definition in the Family from Linear + Hemispherical to Linear + Spherical:

image

The result:

light test project3-7-09-1b"

1 comments:

gjackson@visalighting.com January 26, 2010 at 2:55 PM  

Does anyone out there have renderings featuring the Visa Lighting line of fixtures? If so we'd like to feature you on our website. Contact: bpape@visalighting.com

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