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Monday, September 21, 2009

We All Work For The Project...(The essence of BIM and IPD)

Man, this really nails it on the head. It all makes it so clear about the teamwork approach. I gave a presentation this morning on daylighting calculations for a LEED Platinum project consultant and one of the people kept saying "but that's not how we do it". Just about everything I was saying about sharing data, coordination, the timeline, pricing and everything else, she kept disagreeing with. Everyone else at the company loved what they saw. After the meeting, I was talking with the owner of the company and I asked him why was she so negative. He responded that "she just has to be in control of everything". Apparently, some of the things I talked about in the workflow and process meant that she wouldn't be in control of everything she did now.

Well, that's going to be the make or break factor for the future. Control, ego, selfishness, attitude....or teamwork. With the change in mindset as mentioned below, it certainly is going to be interesting watching how this affects everyone on the team.

>http://doddsandends.typepad.com/blog/2009/09/we-all-work-for-the-project.html

This past week, at the Vela Systems Customer Advisory Board in Boston, Laura Handler from Tocci put up a very simple slide at the end of her presentation. And it read:
"We All Work For The Project"
Weallworkproject
Hmm... I have to say that I was impacted by this slide and it has really made me spend the day thinking about what this means not just to me, but to the business of construction, and to everyone involved. I think that this single statement is true in many ways and I wonder if many project teams have lost sight of this.
Go back to my earlier post about Contractors Building Models. If we all truly had the goal of working for the project in mind, then would we be more willing to share models more freely across an extended design team? Then take that one step further and think about sharing the Information from the Model and "playing nicely" through out the project. I think if we all had a common goal of "working for the project" then we could solve some of the challenges that we still face and share the downstream information that our projects (and models) can yield.
In the end, who do you work for on your projects? Take a moment and reflect on the value of this simple statement and decide what it means to you: "We All Work For The Project"

From: dODDS and ENDS: We All Work For The Project...

Comment:
Timothy R. Hughes September 21, 2009 8:23 PM  
Call it the lawyer in me ... if you get everyone playing nice, this attitude means success. If you do not, diffuse decision-making and lack of clear accountability translate to a lot of potential risk. It is all in the communication, accountability and follow through.

2 comments:

Timothy R. Hughes September 21, 2009 at 8:23 PM  

Call it the lawyer in me ... if you get everyone playing nice, this attitude means success. If you do not, diffuse decision-making and lack of clear accountability translate to a lot of potential risk. It is all in the communication, accountability and follow through.

Christopher G. Hill September 22, 2009 at 8:26 AM  

Yes Tim, that's the lawyer in you. The key is to set out clear responsibilities when working together at the beginning and hopefully heading off issues. Risk is a big deal, but I hope that the reward from cooperation is greater.

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