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Thursday, November 19, 2009

Revit Workset or not?

Just found this post. I hope it helps. Looks like some growing pains in the evolution of the Revitlution.

Repost>http://revitguy.blogspot.com/2009/11/workset-or-not.html

Worksets? Why? I don't really know accept that I have recently found that they are really not necessary. In fact I have found that working with a complex system of worksets actually hinders your performance because you are constantly asking for permissions.

The first two commercial projects we did were set up with worksets for each level. One of my co-workers who as used revit for sometime, was convinced that worksets would help many people work on the same project. But it just seemed like we were always asking for permission.

The current project we are working on, a large hospital type facility, was only set up with 2 worksets. 1. shared levels and grids. 2. Workset 1. These are the defaults that revit sets up. We found that working with several people was not as cumbersome in this scenario. Since revit uses a borrowing system that is element based. whenever you select an element you are effectively borrowing it. when your done, you release it. This is automatic, and doesn't require any additional work. Unlike when you set up many worksets. Because now you have to make sure that the element you create is on the correct workset. What a pain!

After doing some homework, I came to this conclusion. In older versions of Revit they didn't have element borrowing. So if you wanted to use many people on one project you had to have a lot of worksets. Since element borrowing was introduced in Revit 8 I don't think it's really necessary.

In conclusion, when we work on a project that has all the elements on one workset it goes much smoother, and you aren't constantly asking for permission. As you may have to with many worksets.

So, if anyone knows another reason why you would want a lot of worksets, I would be curious to know why because my experiencing more than just one was much more frustrating.



Source: Workset or not?

Blog post comment addendum:
seandburke has left a new comment on your post "Workset or not?":

Without repeating myself too much... I added a comment on the original bog post. There really are good reasons to use more than one workset, just not what is discussed above.

Summary of my thoughts:

Think - visibility control, opening/unloading control, memory conservation, etc... Element borrowing, as described above is preferred.
 
From the origal post comments:
seandburke said...

You don't need a lot of Worksets, that is true. But only having one will lead to less flexibility ion working on the project. Most projects can successfully be organized into 8-12 worksets. These would be for functional, spatial, or systems separation, and not necessarily by tasks or assignments. A little explanation is in order.
The concept of worksets has indeed morphed, since Element borrowing is now the preferred method of worksharing. Day to day workflow should not mean that users should not borrow and entire workset, or large chunks of the building, but more in an ad-hoc way. Take as little as you need to do you work, and the chances of bumping into another user is greatly lessened. You still have to communicate, relinquish and synchronize often.
The argument for categorizing the building into worksets gives you flexibility in two ways:

1). Allowing opening just portions of the project.This can save significantly on the load, save and synchronize times. Project relationships and constraints are still maintained as changes occur, and you can open additional worksets as necessary.

2). Controlling visibility of elements, linked CAD and Revit files, especially with the option to make 'not visible by default in all views'.
I hope this makes sense. Perhaps I will make a video to illustrate these points.
November 19, 2009 8:57 PM

Thanks Sean.

2 comments:

seandburke November 20, 2009 at 12:02 AM  

Without repeating myself too much... I added a comment on the original bog post. There really are good reasons to use more than one workset, just not what is discussed above.

Summary of my thoughts:
Think - visibility control, opening/unloading control, memory conservation, etc... Element borrowing, as described above is preferred.

Christopher Hubbard November 23, 2009 at 1:38 PM  

+1 with Sean

The are many organizational reasons to use multiple worksets similar to how we used layers in CAD. However like CAD too many worksets or poorly organized worksets will hinder both design and production. So when somebody tells me we created multiple worksets and it slowed me down, we created one and it sped up I am skeptical and would like to see more information. For instance,

What type of building?
How many people?
File Size?
Manager involved in organization
etc.

When people tell me worksets do not work I usually tell them its because they were incorrectly used. You can drive a screw with a hammer. Best use of the tool?

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