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Friday, June 11, 2010

AIA2010: Institute Promises to Tackle Two Persistent Problems #AIA2010

You're joking right? Apparently the AIA has solved the world's building energy problems with an excel spreadsheet.

Excerpts:
pledge to develop multi-year action plans and implement steps

The excel tool will generate three easy to decipher graphs that aggregate the individually listed active projects within the Excel sheet. These three graphs represent the report that firms will forward to the AIA. The three charts will show a snapshot of the firm portfolio including: the percentage of GSF of active projects meeting the current reduction goal, the percentage of GSF being modeled and percentage of GSF for which the firm will gather actual energy performance.

Forgive my arrogance on the subject, but WTF? You're going to enter GSF information into a spreadsheet? What exactly is that going to do to ACTUALLY lower energy costs. The biggest problem I see here is that you're going to actually have to purchase Microsoft Excel. Do you have any idea how expensive that program is? Why not just make a version for Google Docs which is free.

After meeting with the President of IES yesterday and seeing what they are adding to their energy analysis software, I'm dumbfounded as to the lack of technology embraced by the architectural profession in regards to actually using software to design and analyze energy usage.

A spreadsheet? Come on people. You make me so mad sometimes. A spreadsheet? You're going to track your projects with some pretty graphs? This is a joke right? AIA promises to tackle to persistent problems? I promised my wife I'd tackle two persistent problems. I promised to take out the garbage more often and to put the dishes in the dishwasher. I'm still promising.....





Miami – June 10, 2010 – As part of the voluntary 2030 commitment program where architecture firms and other entities in the built environment pledge to develop multi-year action plans and implement steps that can advance the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) goal of carbon neutral buildings by the year 2030, the AIA has unveiled a new tool that generates a report on predicted energy use and project modeling.
“This tool is a valuable resource for architecture firms and will be used on their entire portfolio, not just for projects seeking green building certification,” said AIA President, George H. Miller, FAIA. “The tool was specifically developed to be simple to use and to be used by firms of all sizes on a variety of building types, large and small.”
The Excel-based reporting tool will only require the user to enter project use type (from a drop down menu), gross square footage, (GSF), yes/no questions: Is project Interior only? Is project modeled? and predicted energy use intensity (PEUI).
Based on that information, for modeled projects the tool will automatically calculate the national average site EUI for that project type and the project’s percent reduction from the national average EUI toward meeting the firm’s 2030 goal for the current year (currently 60%). For non-modeled projects, users will enter in the design standard or code and similarly the sheet will calculate the project’s contribution toward the firm’s 2030 commitment.
The excel tool will generate three easy to decipher graphs that aggregate the individually listed active projects within the Excel sheet. These three graphs represent the report that firms will forward to the AIA. The three charts will show a snapshot of the firm portfolio including: the percentage of GSF of active projects meeting the current reduction goal, the percentage of GSF being modeled and percentage of GSF for which the firm will gather actual energy performance.
Firms are asked to track all active design projects for the reporting year, not just ones that are seeking green building certification and the reports developed through the tool are meant to provide a year-to-year look of a firm’s work. Firms of all sizes and building type expertise will use the same tool and report in the same manner.
The toolcan be used for any type of building project and was developed through a collaboration between members of the AIA Committee on the Environment, the AIA Large Firm Roundtable, AIA Chicago Chapter Working Group and numerous individuals from AIA member firms.



Architectural Record | Off the Recor

http://archrecord.construction.com/community/blogs/ARBlog.asp?plckController=Blog&plckBlogPage=BlogViewPost&newspaperUserId=ac946cd0-ba4a-4e0e-8da4-47c9e7c5d923&plckPostId=Blog%3aac946cd0-ba4a-4e0e-8da4-47c9e7c5d923Post%3a4e1f2110-11e6-42ef-b4a5-137becd7e295&plckScript=blogScript&plckElementId=blogDest

2 comments:

Anonymous,  June 11, 2010 at 9:20 AM  

Actually, Microsoft Excel is now offered for free online too..

MackTheKnife June 11, 2010 at 9:33 AM  

Can you say "Energy Star"? I knew you could.

Does the same thing only better. How much money did AIA spend on something that already exists?

Robert W. Tinsley, PE

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