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Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Architectural drawing - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - CAD v BIM

I've been having an ongoing conversation with one of my general contractor clients.  For not being a national contractor, his firm is one of my first BIM contractor clients and has the most developed ROI of the BIM process. 

This particular BIM manager and I disagree on many topics, unrelated to our industry, but we agree on the disagreements and value each other's opinions.  It's probably not a good thing to have the sorts of discussions we have in a work relationship, but because we're both so honest in our opinions and respect each other's minds, it works out pretty well.

Well, we've been having an ongoing conversation about CAD vs BIM.  I write that and it kind of looks like a legal case.  CAD v BIM.  The jury is still out on that one.  That makes me think of Row v Wade, the legal case of whether you will sink or swim with BIM.  Yes, I know that sounds like a whole other legal case, but I definitely won't dip my toe in the water on that one here. 

Let's look at Row v Wade.  You can be in a nice boat, skimming along the surface at a fast speed, staying dry, seeing where you are going and have all the things you want or need with you, including other people in the boat.  Or, you can wade, paddle, tread water, use any number of strokes (keystrokes) to try to get to your destination.  Hopefully, you won't drown, especially when that boat rows by you with it's wave covering you with water.

Ok, where was I?  Oh yes, My friendly client sent me an email with the following:


I saw that article too… it’s kind of sad.  To put it in perspective, this has got to be the least-developed topic structure on Wikipedia: there isn’t even have a Drafting topic directly.  It has a presence within Technical Drawing and Architectural (and other disciplinary) drawing and there are Drafter and Daughtsman topics (women need not apply for the latter).  Then there’s the whole CAD/CADD argument still frozen mid-fight on the virtual pages of Wikipedia where the Drafters are apparently at odds with the rest of the industry – by calling it CADD.  No offense to your company.  Maybe you should consider BIMCenters?  I love how Drafter(sman) appear to stress the High School education as well.
So, I went to the first link and came up with the entry below from Wikipedia.  Yes, Wikipedia may have its faults, but I still am going to use it as a valid reference since it compiled by you.


What is so interesting about it is the following:
Architectural drawings are used by architects and others for a number of purposes:
to develop a design idea into a coherent proposal, 
Notice the word coherent.  Sounds like a big SAT word.

to communicate ideas and concepts, 
 Communicate.  That in itself is a big idea.

to convince clients of the merits of a design, 
 I've got no problem with that one except for what's the easiest way to convince a client?  Yes, use a 3D model that the client can see the building and walk through it virtually instead of looking at 3 pretty renderings and not knowing if it will all fit together.

to enable a building contractor to construct it, 
Ah, my favorite line.  To enable.  What exactly do you considering the meaning of "enable".  Does that include RFIs or "don't worry, the contractor will figure it out.  Yes, that's why all of the contractors are moving to BIM. They've enabled themselves and are now becoming Design BIM Builders.  As your fees shrink more and more, the contractors are getting even more services and profits.

...to "construct" it.  The whole point of your drafting, designing, modeling or whatever the heck you want to call yourself, your title, your job, your role or anything else leads to a very simple point.  You exist to "enable a building contractor to construct it."  It's not about lines or layers or colors or what font, section head or anything else. 


as a record of the completed work, and to make a record of a building that already exists.
Well, I'll just reference my phrase of "why are they called 'as-builts'?  Shouldn' they be called as-designed'"?

OK, big finish....
The development of the computer had a major impact on the methods used to design and create technical drawings,[1] making manual draughting almost obsolete, and opening up new possibilities of form using organic shapes and complex geometry. Today the vast majority of drawings are created using CAD software
Computer.  Drafting. Almost obsolete.  New possibilities.  Complex.
BIM Boom Bah.

I do love CAD.  I wouldn't have a blog to write without it. 

Source: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architectural_drawing 


The Concertgebouw (concert hall) in Amsterdam, by Adolf Leonard van Gendt, illustration published 1888.
An architectural drawing or architect's drawing is a technical drawing of a building (or building project) that falls within the definition of architecture. Architectural drawings are used by architects and others for a number of purposes: to develop a design idea into a coherent proposal, to communicate ideas and concepts, to convince clients of the merits of a design, to enable a building contractor to construct it, as a record of the completed work, and to make a record of a building that already exists.
Architectural drawings are drawn according to a set of conventions, which include particular views (floor plan, section etc.), sheet sizes, units of measurement and scales, annotation and cross referencing. Conventionally, drawings were made in ink on paper or a similar material, and any copies required had to be laboriously made by hand. The twentieth century saw a shift to drawing on tracing paper, so that mechanical copies could be run off efficiently.
The development of the computer had a major impact on the methods used to design and create technical drawings,[1] making manual draughting almost obsolete, and opening up new possibilities of form using organic shapes and complex geometry. Today the vast majority of drawings are created using CAD software.[2][3]
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